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The battle for same-sex parental rights is far from over 

| Dec 4, 2020 | Family Law |

Governor Chris Sununu signed House Bill (HB) 1162 into law here in New Hampshire in July. It greatly enhanced unmarried and same-sex parents’ rights when he did, but many argue that there’s a long way to still go

How HB 1162 changed parents’ rights in New Hampshire

Gov. Sununu’s signing of this bill into law made it possible for all unmarried heterosexual and same-sex couples to adopt children. The governor also extended the state’s second-parent adoption statutes to cover same-sex moms and dads wishing to participate in the second-parent adoption process New Hampshire now recognizes a court judgment of parentage as a way for moms and dads to establish their parental rights over a child born via assisted reproduction methods. 

How struggles persist for same-sex parents

The fight that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals have long fought to gain the same rights and protections as heterosexual people isn’t over. While there are many strides that advocates have made since June 26, 2015, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states, there is

a lot of work that still needs to happen related to the recognition of same-sex parents’ rights. There’s no uniformity when it comes to how different jurisdictions treat this issue around the country. Fortunately, New Hampshire is making strides to enhance the LGBT population’s plight in this state. 

A family law attorney can help you as you navigate establishing your parental rights in alignment with the passing of this new New Hampshire law. Let a lawyer who has long been working with members of the LGBT community help you protect and honor your relationship and family in your Nashua case.